Rollsigns from New York City, NY
This New York City "NYCTA" subway end (front) destination sign has no print date. It has 45
exposures. The image of this sign has been drawn virtually perfect to scale, but because some of
the text was so small, the image has been enlarged 1.5 times that of the other signs on the website.
This sign's info tag is shown below. A further update has been added, right/below.
This New York City "NYCTA"
subway, southbound side
destination sign (R32/R38
GOH) is #4 in a set of four.
It is dated September 9, 1989.
The sign has 86 exposures but
only 43 destinations. The
"right-side-up" exposures were
displayed on the outside of the
subway car, while the  
"upside-down" exposures were
displayed on the inside.
The image of this sign has
been drawn virtually perfect to
scale, but because some of the
text was so small, the image
has been enlarged 1.5 times
that of the other signs on the
website.
This sign's info tag is shown
below the sign image. A further
update has been added here.
NYCTA-NO. 13-30-1300
END DESTINATION SIGN
P.O.#31508-188 R-30
TRANSIGN, INC.
NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT AUTHORITY
NYCTA# 00420191
MULTISCREEN # 11154B
OPx-87118, 09/09/89, 4 of 4
SIDE DESTINATION, SOUTH
R32/R38 GOH
PART # 14-81-7395
MANUFACTURED BY
MULTISCREEN INT'L INC.
MADE IN CANADA
This info was supplied by
Jerrold P. Gultz, a
NYC rollsign collector:

This sign you have
displayed (this narrower
one) is a front-end
replacement  destination
sign for R32 and R38 class
of subway cars.  Like all
NYC subway cars delivered
starting in the 1920s, there
were two front signs:  one
route and one destination.  
The R32s were delivered
beginning in 1964.  The
original signs were on
mylar, all capital block
letters with fewer
destination readings.  The
R38s were delivered in
1966 and used the same
signs as the R32s.  The
front-end signs typically
contain ALL terminal station
readings.

These signs were installed,
replacing the originals
sometime in the early
1980s, prior to the GOH
(general complete overhaul)
of those cars at which time
the front route and
destination signs were
replaced with a single,
digital route sign displaying
only the route letter.
This info was supplied by
Jerrold P. Gultz, a
NYC rollsign collector:

This (wider) sign you have
displayed is a side, South
Terminal replacement sign
used in R27s, R30s, R32s and
R38s.  The sides of these cars
had two sign cases, one on
each side of the car.  Each
case had 3 rollsigns:  North
Terminal on top; South
Terminal in the middle and
Route on the bottom.  The
North and South terminal signs
were originally back-lit by a
green fluorescent tube which
was lit only in the direction of
travel.  As such, only one was
lit at a time. The route sign
contained no light fixture.
These signs were actually the
third set of signs installed in
these cars.  The second signs
(first replacement) were
installed at the same time
your front-end destination
sign was.  Their font was
significantly smaller in size
than this set.  This side
destination sign was installed
at the time of the GOH, the
same time the front end
route/destination signs were
replaced with a digital sign.
In (about) 2004, this South
Terminal sign was once again
replaced with a fourth sign
whose readings also included
the general area of the
destination as well as the
exact station e.g. "Lefferts
Blvd" became "Ozone Park-
Lefferts Blvd" on the outside
reading only with the inside
reading remaining the same.
This info was supplied by Jerrold P. Gultz, a NYC rollsign collector:

Both the front-end (left) and side (right) signs you have are from what's currently referred to as "B Divison" cars;  previously known as IND and BMT
divisions which were united as one system when NYC actually took over control of the subways in 1940.  (FYI-"A Division" cars are from what was
previously known as the IRT division-the original subway-whose cars are slightly narrower and shorter than B division cars. The tunnels for the A
division are also narrower than those of the B division.  Track gauge is identical.  As such, A division cars can be used on B division trackage (as work
cars only, not revenue service because the gap between the station platform and the car would be too wide), but B division cars can never operate on
A division trackage (unless you are trying to create a sardine can whose side has been peeled open!).
to go to the NYMTA
electronic sign list page.
This partial New York City
"NYCTA" subway end (front)
destination sign linen is from
a R1-9 type subway car. The
sign has five exposures and
no print date. The image of
this sign has been drawn
virtually perfect to scale.
Hover over
each large
subway
line letter
set to
enlarge its
exposure
reading.
This New York City "MTA Bus" mylar front destination sign is from the
100th Street Depot. There is no print date on the original sign, but it was
updated to February of 1978 with the "M18 / M41" exposures insert, then
again to November of 1980 with the "X23" expsoures insert.
The entire sign has 37 exposures. The image of this sign has been drawn
virtually perfect to scale, but because some of the text was so small, the
image has been enlarged 1.5 times that of the other signs on the website.
Further enlargements of the smallest text are to the left of the main image.