Rollsigns from Gray Coach Lines
Toronto, Ontario
This linen destination
sign was likely
designed for a GMC
parlour coach. It has
no print date. It has
53 exposures.
The sides at each end
narrow from sign
box wear, from years
of in-service use.
This linen route "via"
rollsign was likely
designed for a GMC
New Look. Like
Toronto's rollsigns,
they have an
identification letter
and a version
number. This one is
version
"I-13". It is dated
April 23, 1962, and
has 24 exposures.
Its sign tag is shown
below
This mylar set of signs are off
Pederson Coach MCI MC-9
#478. This bus was formerly
Gray Coach Lines #2247. The
destination sign (left) is dated
February 24, 1970, and has 57
exposures. The "Norfolk",
"Washington", and Pittsburgh"
exposures were added by
Pederson Coach. The route
"via" sign (right) is dated
February 23, 1970 and (yes)
has zero exposures. This is
likely as a result of someone
cropping out the GCL
exposures and replacing only
the blank stub.

Their respective sign tags are
shown below:
M.C.I.GRAY COACH LINES
P.O. 17256-B
2/24/70   TRANSIGN CO.
M.C.I. GRAY COACH LINES
P.O. P-17256-A
2/23/70   TRANSIGN
6933525
G.M.DIESEL LTD.
P.O.A-84484-C 4/23/62


WATERPROOF WASHABLE
DESTINATION SIGNROLL
PRODUCT OF TRANSIGN
PONTIAC,    MICHIGAN
Gray Coach Lines, a subsidiary of the Toronto Transit Commission, was inaugurated in 1927. During its history, it operated
a wide variety of buses, from Yellow Coaches, Macks, White Motor Buses, Twins and Brills, to the more modern GMC
Suburban New Looks and MCI's. With the introduction of
GO Transit bus service in 1970, local and regional routes were
removed from GCL's network. Inevitably, Gray Coach Lines's routes were sold, and the system was discontinued in 1990.

Similar to
GO Transit, Gray Coach Lines's rollsign display is a two-piece configuration. The curb side sign (left)
indicates the final destination of the bus. The street-side sign (right) shows the route taken to the destination.